Mumbles Motor Boat & Fishing Club 
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From1st November new members can join for 14 months paying the price of 12 months. They will pay the annual fee of £30 plus the £10 joining and get the remainder of 2017 membership for free, and membership for the whole of 2018.
Membership Renewal
We can also take renewal of membership for 2018 from now to the end of December. We would like renewal subscriptions to paid by 15 December. This would give time for processing and ensuring you can continue to use the Club facilities in 2018.
 
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Fish ratings

MCS fish ratingsEach of the fish included on the MCS websites have been given a rating to enable you to quickly identify species that are considered to be sustainably produced, and those species which are not. Where a species is considered as being:
 
  • vulnerable to exploitation and/or assessed by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) as threatened
  • from overfished stocks and/or stocks where data is deficient
  • from poorly managed or unregulated fisheries
  • caught using methods which are detrimental to other marine species and habitat
 
then they are more likely to have a higher score, and therefore a poorer rating, e.g. 4 or 5.
 
Conversely, those species from well managed, healthy stocks, which are harvested or produced in ways which have less impact on the environment or non-target species, or are from fisheries or aquaculture systems that are certified as environmentally responsible, are more likely to have a lower score, and therefore a higher rating, i.e. 1 or 2.
 
A species whose production method or management still needs to improve for them to be considered sustainable is likely to obtain an intermediate rating, i.e. 3.
 
The ratings appear in a traffic light-type format as indicated:
 
 Rating 1 (light green) is associated with the most sustainably produced seafood.
 
 Rating 2 (pale green) is still a good choice, although some aspects of its production or management could be improved
 
 Rating 3 (yellow) based on available information; these species should probably not be considered sustainable at this time. Areas requiring improvement in the current production may be significant. Eat only occasionally and check www.fishonline.org for specific details.
 
 Rating 4 (orange) should not be considered sustainable, and the fish is likely to have significant environmental issues associated with its production. While it may be from a deteriorating fishery, it may one which has improved from a 5 rating, and positive steps are being taken. However, MCS would not usually recommend choosing this fish. Follow developments for these species at www.fishonline.org
 

 Rating 5 (red) is associated with fish to be avoided on the basis that all or most of the above bullet points apply.

Fish to Eat are Rated 1 and 2 and Fish to Avoid are Rated 5

 
The rating system has been developed by the Marine Conservation Society as advice for choosing the most environmentally sustainable fish.


Good Fish Guide  Go to www.goodfoodguide.co.uk for a full list
 Example from the MCS good fish guide

Common name - Bass, seabass

Scientific name - Dicentrarchus labrax
Average rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Visit Fishonline for the full range of options available for this species.
Consumer Information
Bass belong to a family of fish closely related to groupers. They are thick-set, rapid swimming predatory fish with silvery-scales, prized by anglers and chefs alike. Bass may be roasted, grilled, baked or barbecued, and can also be steamed or poached. Good with rosemary, garlic or lemon.
Summary
The precise status of bass stocks is unknown and fishing effort and catch is not controlled. The combination of slow growth, late maturity, spawning aggregation, and strong site fidelity, increase the vulnerability of seabass to over-exploitation and localised depletion. Recreational landings are significant and are estimated to exceed commercial catches in some areas. These are largely unreported and unregulated. Seabass caught by handlining methods in the southwest of England are an especially good choice, as all fish can be identified by a tag in the gill, providing traceability back to the individual fisherman who caught it. Ask for fish which has been line-caught and tagged. For more information see www.linecaught.org.uk. The gill-net fishery off the Holderness Coast of north east England, between Flamborough Head Lighthouse and Spurn Point was certified as an enviromentally responsible fishery by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) in December 2007 and is another good choice. Avoid pelagic trawled seabass, as the fishery impacts upon the pre-spawning stock and has significant cetacean bycatch.
Alternatives
(Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 3 and below are included.)

 

Visit Fishonline, the website for the seafood industry, for more detailed information about this species.

 

Common name - Cod, Atlantic Cod

Scientific name - Gadus morhua
Average rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Visit Fishonline for the full range of options available for this species.
Consumer Information
Choose cod caught by longline from the Norwegian MSC certified fishery look for the Blue Tick logo on the packaging - in the NE Arctic. Iceland and the Eastern Baltic can also supply good options for Atlantic cod, depending on capture method. Choose the green rated options to be sure. The fish is brown to green with spots on the dorsal (upper) side with a distinctive lateral line, and a small ??bib' or barbel under its chin which is used to look for food. Cod has white, flaky flesh. The most popular cuts are steaks and fillets which can be poached, grilled or baked. It's easy and quick to cook and is traditionally served with parsley sauce and lemon wedges and of course, chips. Cod roe and milt or sperm is also eaten. Cod produce millions of eggs in winter and spring in February to April. Avoid eating during the breeding season, and check the source of your fish to help conserve stocks.
Summary
With the exception of cod from the northeast Arctic, Iceland and Baltic East, all other cod stocks in the northeast Atlantic are overfished, inefficiently managed or at an unknown level and ICES recommend fishery closures in some of these areas until stocks recover to safe levels. The most depleted stocks are the Faroes, Rockall, Irish Sea, North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat, Eastern Channel, Norweigan coast, Greenland and west of Scotland. The Norwegian NE Arctic offshore cod fishery and the Barents Sea demersal trawl cod fishery within Norwegian and Russian EEZ and in international waters are certified as sustainable fisheries by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). The longline, handline and Danish seine fishery for cod in Iceland's EEZ was certified to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard as an environmentally responsible fishery in June 2011. Danish and Swedish fisheries in the Eastern Baltic were certified to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard as environmentally responsible fisheries in April and June 2011 respectively. Avoid eating cod from stocks which are depleted and where fishing is at unsustainable levels. To help reduce the impact of fishing on fish stocks where fishing mortality is too high, the marine environment, and other marine species, choose line-caught cod where available. Longlining can result in seabird bycatch so ask for fish caught using 'seabird-friendly' methods. See Fishing Methods for details.
Alternatives
(Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 3 and below are included.)

 

Visit Fishonline, the website for the seafood industry, for more detailed information about this species.







Beach Clean Up

The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) Beach Watch project is now in its 16th year of helping to raise awareness of marine pollution and bringing together volunteers to keep our beaches clean. Volunteers survey the beaches they clean, and provide us with the vital information we need to tackle marine pollution at source. Thousands of volunteers take part every year, making Beach Watch the most influential fight against marine litter in the UK.

See what Beach Watch beaches are in your area.

From the latest clean up of Langland beach anglers have been rapped for leaving at lot fishing tackle debris on the beach area.  Volunteers surveying and cleaning up the beach found a mass of fishing debris within the 100m survey area.   161 pieces of fishing net, 55 pieces of fishing line and 32 pieces of line.  This was 32% of the total litter collected, a much bigger proportion compared to other UK beaches.  This is an alarming quantity of fishing material.  Fishing lines and nets are often made of plastic and could remain in the environment for thousands of years, not mention the damage to birds and other marine creatures getting tangled in the litter.

So, please follow our sea angling code and think about your litter and dispose of it carefully.  Help to ensure all fishermen to take more care of the marine environment.

The MCS volunteers will be back on the local beaches for further surveys throughout the year.
 

Ecological Disasters

Too many fish are being taken from the sea, too much rubbish is thrown into the sea and little is done to protect precious marine life and habitats. 

NOW we have large North Devon (Barnstable) based trawlers using specialised Bass trawls hammering the Bass of Gower and Carmarthen Bay. Apparently, these trawlers can fish from May to November, 7 days a week on the following, and other, Bass marks:

Diamond Bank; Ox Bass Bank; Outer Bank; Nobel Banks off Port Eynon; through to Worm's Head and Carmarthen Bay.  It is reported that they are landing tonnes of Bass on a daily basis, with many caught inside the 6 mile limit.

The trawlers seem to be imune from inspection, whilst the recreational fishing boats get inspected rather frequently.  Nothing seems to be able to be done about this barbaric overfishing and destruction of the South Wales fish stock.  Read the article below and then ring and write to Mr P Coats, SWSF Director (01792 654466) and Ms Elin Jones, Rural Affairs Minister, Welsh Assembly Government, Cardiff Bay, Cardiff, CF99 1NA to complain and demand a ban on this type of trawling in the Bristol Channel.

Ban on bottom trawling. 

A ban on bottom trawling has been introduced by UK ministers to protect threatened sea life in 60 square nautical miles of sea off the South West coast of England.  The area will be permanently closed to scallop dredgers and bottom trawlers which drag nets along the sea bed, in order to safeguard the area's rich marine life and habitats. This decision is very welcome for the future of recreational fishing and it is vitally important to demonstrate the harm that bottom trawling does to the environment